Japanese knotweed on the railway line

Landmark ruling on Japanese knotweed encroachment case

Robin Waistell v Network Rail Infrastructure Limited

There have been many cases of adjoining landowners settling Japanese knotweed encroachment cases out of court. With the exception of Flanagan v Wigan Metropolitan Borough Council, there has been an absence of any cases tested in the courts, until the recent case brought by two landowners in South Wales against Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd. 

Japanese knotweed

Consultancy services to improve knowledge and awareness of Japanese knotweed

The team at Environet are well placed in the market to offer expert advice when dealing with Japanese knotweed. 

With over 20 years' experience in the knotweed industry, we offer a variety of consultancy services, designed to improve awareness, dispel the popular myths about knotweed and reassure clients that it can be dealt with, with speed and efficiency. 

Japanese knotweed identification help

Support our chosen charities with Japanese knotweed identification

Japanese knotweed is the UK’s most aggressive and invasive plant, however it can be tricky to identify.

Commonly confused for plants such as Russian vine and bamboo, knotweed wreaks havoc when it comes to buying or selling a property, and can create issues between neighbours. It is especially hard to identify over the winter, as the knotweed lies dormant waiting to re-emerge in the spring. 

Japanese knotweed canes in the winter

Environet's Reflection on 2016

Another year has passed, making it over 20 years that we've now been in business.  

We've continued to grow, not only on the knotweed front. I'm pleased to say two of our employees have given birth this year, so we now have two beautiful babies being trained up on how best to tackle knotweed. There must be something in the air, as a further two employees are expecting babies in 2017, congratulations to all of them.

Japanese knotweed on a construction site

Your Build: Japanese knotweed - a guide for the self-builder

Environet are featured in the latest issue of Your Build, published in December 2016.

Nic Seal, Managing Director of Environet UK, answers some of the frequently asked questions about Japanese knotweed. Some of the common questions concerning knotweed are: is knotweed covered under general insurance policies, what is the best way to tackle Japanese knotweed on a building site, and why is knotweed such a problem. 

Japanese knotweed canes in the winter

Building Engineer: Japanese knotweed - winter treatment

Environet are featured in the latest issue of Building Engineer, published in December 2016.

Environmental scientist and Managing Director Nic Seal speaks to Building Engineer and explains how best to tackle Japanese knotweed on construction sites, dispelling the myth that knotweed can only be eradicated in the summer.

Read the full article here.

Xtract - Japanese knotweed removal machine

Eco Building News: Xtract™ - the eco-friendly way to remove Japanese knotweed

Japanese knotweed is featured in the October/November edition of Eco-Building News. 

The article showcases our unique patented environmentally-friendly removal method - Xtract™. Developed in 2008, Xtract™ has been used across the UK, providing rapid and reliable removal of Japanese knotweed from development and construction sites.

Japanese knotweed autumn leaves

The Week Briefing: The Thug of Japan

Japanese knotweed is featured in The Week magazine, published on 5th November 2016.

Japanese knotweed is often featured in the press, often with inaccurate information. The latest feature in The Week magazine makes for a good read, if you’re interested in all things Japanese knotweed, like we are!

This in-depth article on Japanese knotweed covers how it came to be introduced into the UK as well as methods to eradicate the plant.

Japanese knotweed in the autumn

“Helloweed” - trick or treat time for Japanese knotweed

Trick or treat - don't be fooled, Japanese knotweed is still alive.

It's Halloween again that time of year in the knotweed calendar marking the conclusion of what many people think is the end of the knotweed treatment season. It’s true enough that the knotweed is preparing for its winter dormancy period, where the leaves go yellow and fall, leaving brittle hollow canes, tricking people into thinking the knotweed has at long last died. Of course it’s just disguised as dead, with healthy underground orange rhizomes the colour of pumpkins.

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