Japanese knotweed removal
Eco-innovative
ways of removing
Japanese knotweed

Eco-innovators in Japanese Knotweed removal  solutions. Call today to speak to our friendly team of specialists.

Japanese knotweed removal

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The problem with Japanese knotweed

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia Japonica syn. Polygonum cuspidatum) is a highly invasive non-native weed that can damage foundations and driveways, as well as putting a stop to mortgage applications and construction development plans. First introduced to the UK from Japan in the 1940s as an ornamental plant, Japanese knotweed is now widespread throughout the UK and can be found as a wayside weed and in many private properties across the country. In spring, the bamboo-like stems grow at a rapid rate, reaching up to 2 metres in height. In summer, the plant produces creamy white flowers. Don’t be fooled by its beauty, as Japanese knotweed can quickly dominate the landscape, suppressing all other growth and damaging properties. Over the winter, the above ground growth dies back but the underground rhizome root system remains alive, ready to grow again in spring.

Mortgages lenders require a Japanese knotweed management plan with an insurance backed guarantee to be in place before they will lend on properties with this prolific perennial. Knotweed has the ability to cause significant damage to tarmac, concrete, paving slabs and foundations of properties. Eradication and Japanese knotweed removal requires expertise. It is very difficult to remove by hand, because the rhizome root system extends deep into the ground. Chemical treatment methods require expert application in order to kill Japanese knotweed. There are also various legal considerations when dealing with Japanese knotweed. Private nuisance claims can be brought against a landowner who allows knotweed to spread into adjoining land. Under the provisions made within the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, it is an offence to cause Japanese knotweed to grow in the wild.


Why choose Environet for your Japanese knotweed removal

We pride ourselves on delivering excellent customer service to all of our clients by offering a range of Japanese knotweed removal methods for both large scale development sites and residential properties. We eradicate and kill Japanese knotweed and control the spread of the weed. All of our services are provided with insurance backed guarantees for up to 10 years underwritten by an A-rated insurer at Lloyd’s and recognised and accepted by the majority of the UK's leading banks and building societies for financial lending purposes. We've developed eco-friendly ways of removing Japanese knotweed, such as our Xtract™ method, and are continually researching ways to improve the process. We believe in eco-innovation and continue to sponsor the Schools Eco-Innovation Awards Scheme, supported by Kevin McCloud, MBE.


Latest Japanese knotweed news

Japanese knotweed growing in the garden

Non-disclosure of Japanese knotweed leads to massive increase in misrepresentation claims

A new warning has been issued to buyers of property about the ever increasing spread of Japanese knotweed.

Knotted is dubbed the “UK’s most aggressive and destructive plant”. Based upon the number of enquiries received in the last two months, it seems there must be many desperate sellers prepared to give false information to buyers in order to sell their property, perhaps without fully understanding the consequences of their deceit.

Bindweed - a plant often mistaken for Japanese knotweed

Plants commonly mistaken for Japanese knotweed

Japanese knotweed can halt mortgage applications, so it’s important it’s identified correctly. 

A lot of the calls we receive are from anxious homeowners and potential buyers, who have spotted a suspicious looking plant that has grown rapidly, wasn’t there last year and they’ve been told by a friend that it may be knotweed.

Eco-Innovation Awards Winner

Eco-Innovation Awards Scheme report by winner in First News

Published on 3rd June 2016 in First News, the only weekly newspaper for young people.

Our Eco-Innovations Awards scheme that launched last year at the Moat School features in the latest edition of First News. This newspaper is read by two million 7 to 14 year olds. 

Miles Bloomfield, one of the pupils who took part in the awards, speaks about his experience.

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